Welcome to our curriculum section. From here, you can find out all about our curriculum intent, our long-term plans and explore each subject in more detail. 

Bolton Impact Trust – Curriculum Rationale flowchart

Rationale statement

In all Bolton Impact Trust Academies our students are given a curriculum which is specifically designed to meet their needs. We endeavour to use the best available intelligence to help us decide what a pupil’s personal curriculum plan should look like from the varied curriculum menu that we offer. During the design stage, we utilise data and information to define what success looks like for each student. Once the success criteria is established, the personal curriculum plan (pastoral, behavioural, emotional and academic) is agreed with all parties. We will work backwards from the agreed success criteria to create intent.

 

Using summative and formative assessment methods along with regular review meetings, we regularly analyse pupil progress in all aspects of their personal curriculum plan against the success criteria agreed at the design stage to ensure that their curriculum plan continues to meet their needs.

 

 

 

 

Design

Referral received

Start date agreed if placement appropriate

SEMH/Academic baseline assessments

Professionals and parents consultation

BIT Observations

Options taken from curriculum menu

Personal Curriculum plans agreed

Personal Success criteria agreed

 

 

 

 

Design 

 

 

Deliver  

High quality teaching and learning experiences

Preferred learning styles understood

Strong Core Curriculum

 Reading as an integral part of the diet

Personal Development at the heart of the offer

Time given to breaking down barriers to success

 

 

Deliver

 

 

 

Decide

Personal success data analysed

 

 

 

 

Decide

If sustained success is achieved

 

More challenge applied

New success criteria set

Regular analysis of performance

Present evidence to Commissioners

Return to mainstream setting or move on to long-term specialist provision.

Support Transition

If sustained success isn’t achieved

 

New success criteria set (re-design)

New strategies introduced

Procure more specialist support

Review with all stakeholders

Possible EHCP review

Possible move to specialist setting

       

 

Forwards Centre Curriculum Intent


The Forwards Centre curriculum has the intent of supporting pupils who may have missed significant parts of their education and who may have had a negative experience of learning which has badly affected both their academic self-worth and understanding of their place in society. It is designed to address gaps in both learning and the personal, social and emotional skills in order that children may go on to be successful in the next stage of their educational journey. It is founded in the centre’s core values of Believe, Inspire and Transform. 


We believe in all our children and our curriculum is designed to enable all pupils to experience academic success so that each child also develops belief in themselves over time. Our intent is to provide a curriculum that is realistic, achievable, relevant and accessible to all. An ambitious curriculum that is carefully planned and personalised to promote feelings of trust, safety and self-confidence. 


We provide a curriculum structure that is clear and has well-defined end points. The structure allows rigorous baseline assessments to inform the planning of an appropriate curriculum ‘climbing frame’ for each child. Our curriculum then allows children the time and space to climb from a point and at a pace that is right for them and experience the same joy of learning new things that others experience and should be part of every child’s life. It is designed so that we can use ongoing formative assessment to track each child’s individual progress, treat them as individuals and celebrate their progress on its own merit rather than simply comparing with whole class age related expectations. This individualised approach ensures that no children are disadvantaged due to their academic level, SEND need or what point on their educational journey they are at or what time in the year they arrive. Every child can experience success. 


The Forwards Centre has a two-year rolling programme including reading, writing, maths, science, history, geography, computing, art and music alongside working on an individual basis with each pupils on the personal, social and emotional skills needed to overcome personal barriers to being successful in life. Each child has a personal provision map based on the end points from their education and health care plans (EHCPs) or from advice from a range of professionals such as educational psychologists and occupational therapists. 
Through our ‘Forwards Centre Five’, we ensure that the curriculum goes beyond the academic and that personal development is woven throughout. The ‘Five’ include: Contribution and Readiness; Conduct and Morals; Celebrating Similarity and Difference; Caring for Ourselves; and Culture and Creativity. We encourage children to try new things, find a spark and then develop it into an area of strength and success. This provides opportunities for pupils to develop character, confidence and self-esteem with the aim of providing them with the essential knowledge and cultural capital that they need to be educated citizens and develop a fully rounded appreciation of the world around them.


Our centre runs on a clear set of published SEMH principles designed to create a therapeutic, emotionally regulated environment where children experience and learn the social norms and expectations they will need to be successful in their next setting. Staff live life alongside each child and consistently model positive ways of coping with the challenges that the school day brings.

 
The curriculum has been planned and sequenced so that knowledge and skills build on what has been taught before. It has clear end points for each subject with clearly defined “I know’ and ‘I can’ statements’ defining the knowledge and skills children need to acquire to reach those end point. There is a focus on the ‘sticky knowledge’ we want children to remember and an emphasis on the use of technical language and vocabulary for each subject. Every pupil is entitled to study the full curriculum and develop the knowledge and skills they need to be successful in their next educational setting. 
Our experienced staff have the flexibility to further adapt our curriculum for each child to better meet their SEND needs or to take advantage of their specific interests. This may mean adapting the pitch of a learning activity but may also mean adapting the pace of the lesson, introducing sensory breaks or breaking activities down into small steps in order that a child does not feel overwhelmed. Over time, children may need less adaptation, however, staff are vigilant and recognise that pupils face multiple challenges in their lives and sometimes need more support and adaptation and sometimes less.


Reading is a priority for children at the Forwards Centre with each child being thoroughly assessed on arrival. PM Benchmarking is used to ensure a rigorous and sequential approach to developing fluency and confidence in reading. Our pupils access the PM Benchmarking reading scheme and reading is assessed regularly and every pupil has individual targets to ensure any gaps are addressed and that books are chosen to closely match their next steps. Time is allocated for reading and all pupils have 1:1 reading sessions with staff where they work on their personal reading targets which may include comprehension at a level that appropriate to them. 


Where appropriate, pupils are phonically assessed on arrival at the centre and for our youngest children, and those at the early stages of reading, our focus is on the development of the phonics, language comprehension and communication skills they need to be successful learners. Children who are still at the early stages of their reading journey have access to books that are in line with their phonetical knowledge. The centre uses the DfE validated Twinkl phonics scheme and, through the development of the “Twinkle Toes’ programme, implements it in a way that is particularly effective for meeting the needs of pupils with SEMH needs in an AP setting. 


The documents in this section of the website outline the two-year curriculum programme for each of our classes. For more information, please contact your child's class teacher or Mrs Berry (Deputy Headteacher) - 01204 333660. 

Forwards Centre Curriculum

Reading intent

The Forwards Centre curriculum has the intent of supporting pupils who may have missed significant parts of their education.  As a result, the Forwards Centre provides a focused learning journey starting with the fundamentals of reading.  

Our aim is to deliver a flexible reading model that can provide our learners with the keys to unlock their full potential in life. With this, our aim is to teach a bespoke program of phonics, word reading and comprehension which is individualised to our pupils needs. Within this teaching model, pupils will experience a range of programmes such as: Toe by Toe, Twinkl phonics and PM benchmarking reading scheme. 

It is our intent to encourage and promote a genuine love and interest of reading at the Forwards Centre, therefore, time in the day will be made for pupils to read independently or with a staff member.  As a priority, we will develop confidence and motivation in our readers, which is anchored by regular opportunities to hear high quality non fiction and fiction texts.  The cross curricular vocabulary we teach, aims to provide our pupils with a greater understanding of the world around them and their ability to express themselves effectively. 

Our ethos is to develop an enthusiasm for reading whilst offering opportunities for our pupils to become fluent, confident readers.  We challenge our learners daily to become independent readers with the aim of providing them with the skills to successfully interconnect with society. 

Writing intent

The Forwards Centre curriculum has the intent of supporting pupils who may have missed significant parts of their education.  As a result, at the Forwards Centre we seek to inspire pupils to become confident writers, and provide them with the skills to interconnect with society. 

Our aim is to deliver engaging, cross curricular topics, so our pupils can write with purpose.  As a result, we expose pupils to high quality non-fiction and fiction texts, whilst teaching the different genres of writing.   Lessons are carefully sequenced to cover the key features of each genre so that skills can be gradually embedded and built upon progressively,  

We want to instil a feeling of pride in our pupils writing, so we schedule time each day for handwriting practice, and give our pupils chances to express themselves by planning, editing and publishing their own work. Our ethos is to create a culture that challenges children to improve their writing, whilst developing a safe learning environment for children to work at their own pace.  

At the Forwards Centre, We want our pupils to build the cultural capital they need to interconnect with society, therefore, it is our aim to teach a range of new words to our pupils. We want our pupils to have social mobility, and have the vocabulary to talk about their own writing with their friends and family. Ultimately, we want our pupils to generate long lasting life skills and work towards becoming confident, independent writers.

 

Forwards Centre English Long Term Plan

 

Phonics intent

 

At The Forwards Centre, we want children to learn to read fluently, accurately and confidently. We know that reading is the key that unlocks the whole curriculum and enables them to access their learning. Therefore, the ability to decode efficiently is essential. We also want children to see reading as not only a task set by teachers in school as part of the curriculum but also as an activity, which provides pleasure and escape from the modern world.

 

We passionately believe that, with the right support, all children can and will learn to read. Therefore, for all children to be successful, we have developed our own phonics programme based on Twinkl Phonics and Toe by Toe.  Our flexible phonics program provides a structured pathway for our pupils to develop their understanding of relationship between the phonemes and graphemes.  It is our intent to encourage and promote a genuine love and interest for reading, with the aim of providing our children with the skills to successfully interconnect with society.

Oracy Intent statement

 

Talking and eloquence are not the same: to speak and to speak well are two things. A fool may talk, but a wise man speaks - Heinrich Heine

 

At The Forwards Centre, we recognise both the importance of oracy and the impact that this has on a child’s success both in school and on their life beyond.  Our aim is to provide a high quality oracy education where pupils learn ‘through talk’ and ‘to talk’ by developing and deepening subject knowledge. We plan for opportunities which are designed, modelled, scaffolded and structured to enable pupils to learn skills needed to talk effectively.

 

Opportunities for oracy are regular, purposeful, appropriately pitched and planned with careful consideration to ensure that pupils are well prepared to meet expectations.

.

Maths Intent

At the Forwards Centre, we recognise the importance of children receiving a high quality maths education, as maths is “a universal language that enables understanding of the world” and “attainment in the subject is the key to opening doors”.  

We believe that every child can be successful in maths regardless of their starting point. The vast majority of our pupils have missed out on learning at some point in the past for a wide range of reasons. Our curriculum takes this into account and is personalised, flexible and designed to allow pupils to build self-confidence and re-engage with learning.

The aim of our maths curriculum is to

  • ensure that our pupils develop a secure understanding of the key concepts and basic facts to ensure that working memory is not overloaded when working on challenging activities that deepen understanding
  • provide pupils opportunities to acquire a rich and developed vocabulary through the use of stem sentences, enabling them to communicate their ideas with mathematical precision as well as clarity.
  • enable pupils to display a high level of pride in the presentation and understanding of their work
  • ensure that pupils are well prepared for the next step on their academic journey, whether that be returning to a mainstream primary, a specialist provision or secondary school
  • provide opportunities to demonstrate an increased ability to work independently

 

Underpinning all this is the recognition we have, that for pupils to succeed, we need to provide a positive, safe and stabilising setting. This requires us to ensure that pupils feel safe in making mistakes and understand that making mistakes are a vital part of learning.  Pupils will be allowed to work at their own pace and will not be rushed through the curriculum until they have become secure in the topic and level they are working at.   We aim to create an environment where pupils are free to develop a love for the subject without having to compare and compete against others.

Our curriculum is designed in such a way that allows progress to be made in small incremental steps, allowing pupils time to progress at their own speed. Our experience has shown us that stretching a pupil too far before they are ready can have a huge detrimental effect on our pupils. A carefully managed and implemented learning journey is part of our each classes weekly planning.

The curriculum is based around White Rose maths scheme and supplemented with a range of other resources, including NCETM, Learning by Questions, Splash Learn and Prodigy. This allows us to deliver high quality, standardised activities in each classroom while also allowing us the freedom and flexibility to tailor the curriculum to cater for each pupil’s individual learning needs.

Key knowledge and skills are regularly revisited allowing repetition to embed understanding. Each class has daily activities that allow pupils to consolidate previous knowledge and retain the skills that they have previously acquired. These activities are embedded alongside daily times tables practise, working on pupils rapid recall abilities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn 1

Week 1

Place Value

Week 2

Place Value

Week 3

Place Value

Week 4

Place Value

Week 5

Addition / Subtraction

Week 6

Addition / Subtraction

Week 7

Addition / Subtraction

Autumn 2

Week 8

Addition / Subtraction

Week 9

Multiplication / Division

Week 10

Multiplication / Division

Week 11

Multiplication / Division

Week 12

Multiplication / Division

Week 13

Shape

Week 14

Shape

Spring 1

Week 1

Multiplication / Division

Week 2

Multiplication / Division

Week 3

Multiplication / Division

Week 4

Multiplication / Division      

Week 5

Time / Money

Week 6

Time / Money

 Spring 2

Week 7

Time / Money

Week 8

Time / Money                       

Week 9

Fractions  

Week 10

Fractions

Week 11

Fractions                                

Summer 1

Week 1

Place Value

Week 2

Place Value

Week 3

Place Value

Week 4

Place Value

Week 5

Addition / Subtraction

Week 6

Addition / Subtraction

Week 7

Addition / Subtraction

Summer 2

Week 8

Multiplication / Division

Week 9

Multiplication / Division

Week 10

Multiplication / Division

Week 11

Multiplication / Division

Week 12

Measurement

Week 13

Measurement

Week 14

Measurement

Science Intent

At the Forwards Centre, we want our children to be naturally inquisitive about the world around them.  We want to embrace their sense of wonder about natural phenomena and inspire them to think scientifically about the world around them.  We aim to develop children’s ideas and ways of working that enable them to make sense of the world in which they live. We want our children to develop an understanding of the uses and implications of Science, how it has changed and shaped our lives today and for the future. 

We guide our children and support them using the Bolton Impact Trusts core values of ‘Believe’, ‘Inspire’, ‘Transform’.

We ‘believe’ in our children and their capability in understanding the specific substantive knowledge for each discipline of the Science National Curriculum. We have high expectations of our children and believe that all children will achieve regardless of their starting point.

We aim to ‘inspire’ our children and follow their lead when they enquire about the scientific world, ensuring that they use those crucial disciplinary skills alongside their substantive knowledge to ensure cohesion, reasoning and a deeper understanding.

We help to ‘transform’ our children to become life longer learners, who want to know more about the world in which they live.

In order to do this, we aim to provide our children with rich learning experiences that:

  • Help acquire a growing understanding of the nature, processes and methods of scientific ideas. 
  • Help develop and extend our children’s scientific concept of their world. 
  • Build on our children’s natural curiosity, developing a scientific approach to problems. 
  • Encouraging open-mindedness, perseverance and developing the skills of investigation – including: observing, measuring, predicting, hypothesising, experimenting, communicating, interpreting, explaining and evaluating. 
  • Develop the use of scientific language, recording and techniques. 
  • Ensure that misconceptions are addressed, that children are practicing and retrieving information, building upon prior knowledge and helping children to embed their procedural knowledge to long term memory and make crucial links to other areas of the curriculum. 
  • Prepare our children for the next step on their academic journey, whether that be returning to a mainstream primary, a specialist provision or secondary school.

Forwards Centre Science: LONG-TERM OVERVIEW

 

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

KS1

 Cycle A

Animals including humans

Animals and the human body

Everyday materials

Seasonal Changes 

 Plants, Variation and Classfication 

Light

Animals including humans

Animals and the human body

KS1 

Cycle B

Animals including humans

Growing and staying healthy

Living things

 

Everyday materials 

Classifying and grouping materials 

Electricity

 Living things

 Habitats

Plants – Growing plants

Variation and Classfications  

LKS2

 Cycle A

Animals, including humans

Nutrition and the body

Light

Rocks, Soil and Fossils

Plants – Plant life

Movement Forces and Magnets 

LKS2 

Cycle B

 All Living Things – Classification and Habitats

Everyday Materials 

Properties and States of Matter

Sound

Electricity

Animals, including humas – teeth, digestion and food chains

UKS2 

Cycle A

Animals including Humans – circulation and keeping healthy

Electricity - Circuits

Living things –

 Habitats classification and variation 

 

Light

Evolution and Inheritence

UKS2 

Cycle B

Animals including Human Reproduction

Everyday Materials – Properties and changes of materials

Living Things 

 Life Cycle

Earth and Space

Forces and Magnetism 

 

KS1 Cycle A -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

 

In this unit of work, pupils cover the following...

 

Component knowledge

Vocab 

Autumn 1

Animals including humans

 

Animals and the human body

  • I can name and identify a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals 
  • I can name and identify a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores

 

  • I can identify and classify animals by what they eat ( carnivores, herbivores and omnivores) 
  • I can identify and classify common animals (birds fish amphibians reptiles mammals and invertebrates) 

 

 

 

fish, 

amphibians

reptiles,

birds 

mammals 

carnivores, herbivores

omnivores

animals

humans

pets 

domestic 

wild

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn 2

 

 

 

Everyday materials

  • I can name different materials 
  • I can describe a material using my sense 
  • I can describe materials using my sense using specific scientific words (e.g. hard/soft, stretch/stiff, shiny/dull, rough/smooth, bendy/not bendy, waterproof/not waterproof, absorbent/not absorbent opaque/transparent) 
  • I can explain what material, objects are made from 
  • I can distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made
  • I can identify and name a range of everyday materials (wood rock plastic metal water)
  • I can describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials 
  • I can compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties 
  • I can sort materials into groups by a given criteria 

 

  • I can perform a simple test 

I can gather and record data to answer a question

Idea – ask question – what would be the best material to make an umbrella out of? 

 

Lesson 1 – observe, explore and describe materials 

Lesson 2 – What are they made from? 

 

Material

hard/soft, stretch/stiff, shiny/dull, rough/smooth, bendy/not bendy, waterproof/not waterproof, absorbent/not absorbent opaque/transparent

wood rock plastic matel water

 

Spring 1

 

Seasonal Changes

  • I can observe changes across 4 season 
  • I can observe and describe the weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies 

 

I can gather and record data to help answer a question

Idea – making tables and charts about the weather over different seasons 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seasons 

Spring 

Summer 

Autumn 

Winter

Weather 

Day 

Night 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring 2

Plants, Variation and Classfication

  • I can name the petal, stem, leaf, and root of a plant and / or tree 
  • I can describe the parts of a plant ( roots stem leaves and flowers) 
  • I can identify and name a range of common plants and trees 
  • I can recognise deciduous and evergreen trees 

 

  • I can observe closely using simple equipment - compare and contrast different plants using a magnifying glass 
  • I can identify and classify plants – I can explain the way that I have grouped them
  • I can keep a record of how plants change over time (plant diary) 
  •  

 

petal, stem, leaf, root trunk

plant Branches

tree

evergreen 

deciduous

names of common plants / trees that we want children to know

Summer 1

Light 

  • I can identify and name light sources
  • I can identify and name sources of light that I can see
  • I can explain what darkness is, using words such as shadow
  • I can compare sources of light (darker light, brightest dullest)
  • I can observe and describe shadows during the day 

 

I can perform simple tests 

I can use my observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions 

I can gather and record data to help answer a question

 

Idea – 

Play shawdow tag – how easy is it to catch the shadow

Does your shadow always look like that? 

What was your shawdow like first thing in the morning 

Is it better to play shadow tag at lunchtime or afterschool? 

Make a bar chart of paper stips to show shadow length – against time intervals 

 

 

Light 

Dark 

Shadow

Sun

Light source 

Man made 

Torch 

Darkness 

Brightest 

Dullest 

 

Summer 2

Animals including humans

 

Animals and the human body

  • I can name the parts of an animals body 
  • I can compare the bodies of different animals 
  • I can point out some of the differences between different animals
  • I can name the parts of the human body that I can see
  • I can identify the main parts of the human body and link them to my senses 
  • I can ask a simple question and recognise that it can be answered in different ways 
  • I can perform a simple test 

 

Idea - Perfrom senses test to be able to to compare different textures / sounds / smells and tastes. – use question – strawberries are the yummiest fruit….. discuss. 

 

 

Sense – taste smell touch sight hearing

 

Head 

Neck 

Skeleton

Arm 

Elbow

Leg

Knee

Face 

Ear

Eye

Hair 

mouth

teeth

bones

 

KS1 Cycle B -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

 

In this unit of work, pupils cover the following...

 

Component knowledge

 

Autumn 1

Animals including humans

 

Growing and staying healthy

  • I know that animals including humans have offspring 
  • I know that offspring grow into adults 
  • I can describe the life cycle of some living things e.g. egg, chick chicken
  • I can describe what animals need to survive 
  • I can describe the basic needs of animals including humans 
  • I can describe why exercise and a balanced diet are important for humans

 

I can ask a simple question 

I can suggest a way to find answers to the question 

 Ideas

 – what do humans need to stay healthy – children to think of way to find the answer 

Or How do butterflies “grow” - Observe lifecycle

 

 Nutrition

 Diet 

Reproduction

Growth

Life cyc;e

Egg chick chicken

Egg caterpillar pupa butterfly

Spawn tadpole frog

Lamb sheep

Baby toddler child teenager adult 

Off spring 

Autumn 2

Living things – 

Alive or not alive 

 

 

 

 

 

Food chains 

  • I can decide whether something is living, dead or never been alive 
  • I can explain the differences between living and non-living things 

 

  • I can identify and classify things according to whether they are alive, dead or never alive, recording findings using a chart.  I can describe how I have decided where to place things  

 

  • I can explain how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food
  • I can construct a simple food chain that includes humans (grass, cow, human)

 

 

Living

Non living

Dead

 

 

Food chain 

Food source 

 

 

 

Spring 1

Everyday materials 

Classifying and grouping materials 

  • I can identify and compare the uses of a range of everyday materials (wood metal plastic glass brick/ rock paper/cardboard) 
  • I can explain why a material might be useful for a specific job 
  • I can explain how solid shapes can be changed by squashing bending twisting and stretching
  • I can explore how the shapes of solid objects can be changed (squashing bending twisting stretching)
  • I can find out about people who developed useful new materials (Dunlop Mackintosh, MacAdam)
  • I can explain how things move on different surfaces 

 

I can identify and classify materials 

I can observe closely using simple equipment 

 

Idea  - compare the uses of everyday materials in and around school with materials found in other places 

Or Identify and classify the uses of different materials – observing them closely and recording observations 

 

 

Metal 

Wood

Plastic

Glass

Properties of materials 

 Squashing

 bending 

 twisting 

 stretching

Material

hard/soft, stretch/stiff, shiny/dull, rough/smooth, bendy/not bendy, waterproof/not waterproof, absorbent/not absorbent opaque/transparent

wood rock plastic matel water

Spring 2

Electricity

  • I can identify everyday appliances which use electricity 
  • I can recognise that electricity is an important source of light 
  • I can explain how bulbs work in an electrical circuits 

 

I can ask simple questions 

I can perform simple tests 

Idea – complete investigation to make a bulb light up – how can they make it brighter ? what do they need to ensure to make the light light up ?

 

Electricity 

Circuit 

Bulb

Source 

Appliance 

Summer 1

Living things

 Habitats

  • I can describe how a habitat provides for the basic needs of things living there. 
  • I can describe a range of different habitats 
  • I can describe how plants and animals are suited to their habitats
  • I can match certain living things to the habitats they are found it 
  • I can identify and name a variety of plants and animals found in different habitats and microhabitats 

 

  • I can collect weather data about a local habitat and use it to explain the plants and animals they will find there.
  • I can compare how plants grow in different conditions by making measurements. 
  • I can observe different habitats and microhabitats closely, using simple equipment, to describe and find out how the   

 

 

Habitats

Micro habitat

Local environment 

Shelter

Source of food

Seashore

Woodlands

Ocean

Rainforest

 

Summer 2

Plants – Growing plants

 

 

  • I can describe what plants need to survive (water, light and a suitable temperature) 
  • I can describe how seeds and bulbs grow and stay healthy 
  • I can explain that plants grow and reproduce 

 

I can perform a simple test 

      I can gather and record data to answer a question 

 Idea 

Complete investigation to find out what plants need to survive and stay healthy

 

 

Fruit 

Vegetables 

Bulb

Branches 

petal, stem, leaf, root trunk

plant

tree

germinaton 

growth 

survival 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

              

 

LKS2 Cycle A -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

 

In this unit of work, pupils cover the following ..

 

Component knowledge

Vocab 

Autumn 1

Animals, including humans

 

Nutrition and the body

  • I can explain the importance of a nutritious balanced diet 
  • I know that animals (including humans) cannot make their own food and get nutrition from what they eat.
  • I know how animals, including humans get nutrients from what they eat
  •  I can identify that humans and some animals, have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.

 

I can gather, record, classify and present data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions – identify and group animals with / without skeletons and observing and comparing movement – exploring idea about what would happen if a human did not have a skeleton

 

I can ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquires to answer them 

I can record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts and tables.

  • Pupils might research different food groups and how they and how they keep us healthy and design meals based on what they find.

 

nutritious balanced diet

nutrients

skeletons

muscles

Autumn 2

Light

  • I know that we need light in order to see things 
  • I know that dark is the absence of light 
  • I can observe that light is reflected from surfaces 
  • I know that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect my eyes 
  • I can explain how shadows are formed (when the light from the light source is blocked by a solid object)
  • I can find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change 

 

I can ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquires to answer them 

I can set up a simple practical enquiry, comparative and fair test 

I can make systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, take accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment

I can record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts and tables.

I can report findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions 

I can use results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions 

 

Ideas – 

Explore how light behaves by using mirrors to see what happens when light reflects off a mirror

Look for shadows – measure them and look for patterns in what happens to them when the light source moves or the distance between the light source and the object changes 

 

 

 

Absence

Reflect

Shadow

 

 

 

 

Spring

 

 

 

 

Rocks, Soil and Fossils

  • I can compare and group together different rocks based on their simple physical properties 
  • I can describe and explain the differences between sedimentary and igneous rocks, considering the way they are formed 
  • I can describe and explain how different rocks can be useful to us 
  • I can describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rocks
  • I can recognise the soils are made from rocks and organic matters 

 

I can make systematic and careful observations

I can ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquires to answer them 

I can gather, record, classify and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions 

 

Ideas 

-Observe rocks including those used in buildings and gravestones – exploring how and why these might have changed over time

-Use hand lens /microscopes to help identify and classify rocks according to whether they have grains or crystals / fossils in them

-Research and discuss different kinds of living things whose fossils are found in sedimentary rock and explore how fossils are formed 

-Explore different soils and identify similarities and differences between them and investigating what happens when rocks are rubbed together or what changes occur when they are in water – or raise and answer questions about the way soils are formed

.  

Lesson 1 – Soil, look/feel/describe.

Lesson 2 – Compare and group different rocks based on appearance

Lesson 3 – Compare and group different rocks based on properties (pourous, non-porous etc)

Lesson 4 – Uses of different rocks and why they are useful for that role

Lesson 5 – Sedimentary rocks (vocab lesson)

Lesson 6 – Fossils in Sedimentary 

Sedimentary 

Porus

Fossil 

Igneous 

Metamorphic 

 

Summer 1

Plants – Plant life

  • I can identify and describe the functions of different parts of plants (roots stem/trunk, leaves and flowers) 
  • I can explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil and room to grow) – and how they vary from plant to plant (Can identify what a plant needs for life and growth)
  • I can investigate the ways in which water is transported within plants 
  • I can explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.
  • Can describe 2 ways of pollination (insect pollination and wind pollination)

 

I can ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquires to answer them 

I can record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts and tables.

I can report findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions 

I can set up a simple practical enquiry, comparative and fair test 

 

Idea – investigate / observe how water is transported around a plant 

 

 

 

  Lesson 1 – Parts of Plants

  Lesson 2 – What do plants need to grow well

  Lesson 3 – Moving Water 

INVESTIGATION/EXPERIMENT 

  Lesson 4 – Experiment about how to check to see the movement of water (celery/roses and coloured water)

  Lesson 5 – Fantastic Flowers

  Lesson 6 – Fantastic Flowers, Pollination

  Lesson 7 – Life Cycle of a plant 

 

  (Pupils should beintroduced to the relationship between structure and function: the idea that every part does a job and that plants can make their own food)

 

plants (roots stem/trunk, leaves and flowers) 

air 

light 

water

nutrients

transported 

life cyle of a plant 

pollination 

 

Summer 2

Movement Forces and Magnets

  • I can compare how things move on different surfaces 
  • I can observe that some forces need contact between 2 objects, but magnetic forces can be transmitted without direct contact 
  • I can observe that some magnets attract / repel each other and attract some materials but not others 
  • I can classify (compare and group) a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials 
  • I can describe that magnets have 2 poles 
  • I can predict whether 2 magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing.

 

I can gather, record, classify and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions 

I can ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquires to answer them 

I can set up a simple practical enquiry, comparative and fair test 

I can record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts and tables.

I can report findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions 

I can use results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions 

I can identify differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes 

 

 

Ideas

compare how different things move and group them , raising questions and carrying out tests to find out how far things move on different surfaces and gathering recording data to find answers to questions; exploring the strengths of different magnets and finding a fair way to compare them; sorting materials into those that are magnetic and those that are not; looking for patterns in the way that magnets behave in relation to each other and what might affect this, such as strength of magnet or which poles face each other, identifying how these properties make magnets useful in everyday items and suggesting creative uses for different magnets.  

 

 

 

Forces 

Poles 

Repel

Surfaces 

Strength 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LKS2 Cycle B -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

 

In this unit of work, pupils cover the following ..

 

Component knowledge

Vocab

Autumn 1

All Living Things – Classification and Habitats

  • I can recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways 
  • I can explore and use a classification key to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in my local and wider environment 
  • I recognise that environments change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things

I can make systematic and careful observations

I can gather, record, classify and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions 

I can record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts and tables.

I can report findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions 

I can use results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions 

 

  • Idea
  • Could make simple guides and keys to explore and identify local plants / animals – making guide to local living things 
  • Raising and answering questions based on observations of animals and what they have found out about other animals they have researched

 

Investigate how habitats change over the year 

Explore ways of grouping wide selection of living things – including animals, flowering plants, non-flowering plants; vertebrate animals into fish / amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals and invertebrates  

 

Investigate human impact on environment (positive / negative) – such as positive impact of nature reserves, ecologically planned parks / garden ponds and negative effects of population and development, litter and deforestation 

 

living things – including animals, flowering plants, non-flowering plants; vertebrate animals into fish / amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals and invertebrates  

habitats 

environment 

human impact 

population development 

deforestation 

Autumn 2

Everyday Materials 

Properties and  States of Matter

  • I can compare and group materials based on their states of matter according to whether they are liquid, solid or gas
  • I can observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled and measure or research the temperature at which this happens (degrees C)
  • I can identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature 

I can make systematic and careful observations

I can gather, record, classify and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions 

I can record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts and tables.

I can report findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions 

I can use results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions 

I can identify differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes 

 

Ideas –

Grouping and classifying variety of materials exploring the effect of temperature on substances (chocolate cream butter – could make crispy cakes!) 

Research temperature at which materials change state such as when iron melts or when oxygen condenses to a liquid

Observe and record evaporation over period of time – puddle on playground, washing on a line, 

Investigate effect of temperature on washing drying or snowman melting 

Could explore variety of everyday materials and develop simple description of state of matter - Solids hold their shape, liquids form a pool (not a pile) and gas escpaes from unsealed container

Pupils should observe water as a solid, a liquid and a gas – and learn about changes to water when heated / cooled. 

 

(avoid using materials where is heating is associated with chemical change e.g. baking / buring) 

 

State of matter 

Liquid 

Solid 

Gas 

Compress(ible)

Shape

Energy

Contract

Expands

Boiling

Condensation

Melting

Freezing

Degrees Celsius

Boiling point

Melting point

Non-newtonian fluid

Flow

Cooled 

Heated 

Evaporation 

Condensation 

Water cycle 

Spring 1

Sound

  • I can identify how sounds are made associating some of them with something vibrating 
  • I can recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear 
  • I can find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it
  • I can find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it
  • I can recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases

 

I can ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquires to answer them 

I can set up a simple practical enquiry, comparative and fair test 

I can record findings using simple scientific language, 

I can report findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions 

I can use results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions 

 

 

  • Idea – could investigate – which material would be best to make a pair of ear defenders (- which material would give insulation against sound)
  • Make and play own instruments – by using what they have found out about pitch and volume  

 

Pitch 

Volume

Vibration 

Sound

Louder

Fainter

 

Spring 2

 

Electricity

  • I can construct a simple series electrical circuit 
  • I can identify and name basic parts of an electrical circuit – cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers
  • I can identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery 
  • I can recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit.
  • I can recognise some common conductor and insulators and associate metals with being good conductors 

 

I can use straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings

 

Ideas 

Observe patterns – e.g. bulb gets brighter if more cells are added, that metal tends to be a conductor of electricity – that some materialls can and some cannot be used to connect across a gap in a circuit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • electrical circuit –
  •  cells, wires, bulbs, switches motors buzzers
  • conductor and insulators
  • current voltage (might introduce)

 

Summer

Animals, including humas – teeth, digestion and food chains

  • I can identify and name the basic parts of the human digestive system
  • I can describe the function of the organs of the human digestive system 
  • I can identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions 
  • I can compare the teeth of herbivores and carnivores 
  • I can construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey

 

I can report findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions 

I can gather, record, classify and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions 

I can use straight forward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support my findings.

 

Comparing teeth of herbivores/ carnivores – suggesting reasons for differences

Investigating what damages teeth  / how to look after them 

Draw and discuss their ideas about digestive system – compare them to models and / images 

 

 

Digestive system 

Mouth 

Tongue 

Teeth 

Oesophagus

Stomach

Intestine 

Carnivorwe 

Herbivore 

Molars 

Incisors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UKS2 Cycle A -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

 

In this unit of work, pupils cover the following ..

 

Component knowledge

Vocab

Autumn 1

Animals including Humans – circulation and keeping healthy

I can identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system

  • I can describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood 
  • I can recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way that my body functions
  • I can describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans 

 

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

I can identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

 

Ideas 

Explore the work of scientists and specific research about the relationship between diet, exercise, drugs lifestyle and health  

 

Circulatory system 

Heart 

Blood vessels 

Blood

Diet

Exercise 

Drugs 

Nutrients

 

Autumn 2

Electricity - Circuits

  • I know that the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer are linked to the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit 
  • I can compare and give reasons for variation in how components function, including bulb brightness, buzzer volume and / off position of switches
  • I can use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram

I can plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary 

I can use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations

 

Idea – systematically identifying the effect of changing one component at a time in a circuit 

Designing and making a set of traffic lights 

Designing and making a burglar alarm

 

 

 

Spring 1

 

 

Living things –

 Habitats classification and variation 

 

  • I can explain how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences (micro- organisms, plants and animals)
  • I can give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics

 

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

I can identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

I can record data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables and bars and line graphs 

 

Ideas

Use classification systems and keys to identify some animals and plants from immediate environment. 

Research unfamiliar animals / plants from a broad range of other habtats and decide where they belong in the classification system. 

Lesson 1 – Characteristics of Vertebrates

Lesson 2 – Characteristics of Invertebrates

Lesson 3 – Characteristics of Mammals

Lesson 4 – Characteristics of Birds

Lesson 5 – Characteristics of Amphibions. 

Lesson 6 – Grouping Vertebrates using reasoning

Lesson 7 – Grouping Invertebrates using reasoning. 

 

  Micro organisms

  Plants 

  Animals 

  Vertebrates (reptiles, fish, amphbians, birds and mamals) 

  Invertebrates (insects, spiders, snails, worms) 

Carl Linnaeus – scientist – a pioneer of classification 

 

 

 

Spring 2

 

 

Light

  • I know that light appears to travel in straight lines 
  • I can use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye 
  • I can explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes
  • I can use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shapes as the objects that cast them

I can plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary 

I can use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations

I can identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

 

Idea 

Decide where to place rear view mirror on a car 

Design a periscope ad use the idea that light appears to travel in straight lines to explain how it works

Investigate relationship between light sources, objects and shadows by using shadow puppets 

· Extend experience of light by looking at phenomena including rainbows, colours on soap bubbles, objects looking bent in water and coloured filters (they do not need to explain why these phenomena occur)  

  Lesson 1 – How we see

  Lesson 2 – Reflecting Light

  Lesson 3 – Refraction

  Lesson 4 – Spectacular Spectrum

  Lesson 5 – Seeing Colours

  Lesson 6 – Shadow Theatre

Refraction 

Reflection 

Summer

Evolution and Inheritence

  • I can recognise that living things have changed over time
  • I know that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago 
  • I know that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents 
  • I can identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptions may lead to evolution 

 

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

I can identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

 

Ideas 

Observe and raise questions about local animals and how they are adapted to their environment 

Compare how some living things are adapted to survive in extreme conditions – e.g. cactuses, penguins and camels

Analyse the advantages and disadvantages of specific adaptations, such as being on 2 feet rather than 4, having a long or short beak, having gills / lungs, tendrils on climbing plants, brightly coloured / scented flowers.

Introduced that idea that characterisitcs are passed on from parent to offspring –e.g. dogs – Labrador and poodle = labradoodle 

 

Apprecitate that variation in offspring over time can make animals more or less able to survive in particular environments e.g. exploring how giraffe’s necks got longer, or development of insulating fur on the artic fox

 

(do not have to understand how genes or chromosomes work) 

 

 

 

 

 

UKS2 Cycle B -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

 

In this unit of work, pupils cover the following ..

 

Component knowledge

Vocab 

Autumn 1

Animals including Human Reproduction

  • I can describe the changes as humans develop to old age 
  • I can create a timeline to indicate stages of growth in humans 
  • I can explain what puberty is 

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

 

Ideas 

Research gestation periods of other animals and compare them to humans; by finding out and recording the length and mass of a baby as it grows 

 

 

 

Sexual reproduction 

Asexual reproduction 

Autumn 2

Everyday Materials – Properties and changes of materials

  • I can compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal) and response to magnets 
  • I know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution
  • I can describe how to recover a substance from a solution
  • I can use my knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating.
  • I can give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials including wood, plastic and metals 
  • I can demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes
  • I can explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda. 
  • I can describe changes using scientific words (evaporation / condensation)
  • I can correctly use the terms reversible and irreversible

I can plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary

I can use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

Ideas 

Carry out test to answer questions – “ Which materials would be most effective for making a warm jacket, for wrapping ice cream to stop it melting, or for making black out curtains?” 

Compare materials in order to make a switch circuit

Observe and compare the changes that take place, for example when burning different materials or baking bread or cakes

Might research and discuss how chemical changes have an impact on our lives – e.g. cooking and discuss the creative use of new materials such as polymers super sticky and super thin materials

 

 

 

hardness,

solubility, 

transparency, 

electrical conductivity thermal conductivity  

substance

filtering, 

sieving 

evaporating

reversible changes.

Irreversible change 

Evaporation 

Condensation 

 

Spring 1

Living Things

Life Cycle

  • I can describe and compare the life cycles of a range of animals, including humans, amphibians, insects and birds
  • I can talk with knowledge about birth, reproduction and death of familiar animals or plants 
  • I can explore the work of well know naturalists and animal behaviourists (David Attenborough and Jane Goodall)

 

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

I can identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

 

Ideas

Observe and compare the life cycle of plants and animals in their environment,  with other plants and animals around the world (in the rainforest, in the oceans, in desert areas and in prehistoric times) 

asking pertinent questions and suggesting reasons for similarities and differences.   

 

Try to grow new plants from different parts of parent plants e.g. seeds, stem and root cuttings, tubers, bulbs.

 

Observe changes in animals over period of time – by hatching and rearing chicks – comparing how different animals reproduce and grow

 

seeds, stem and root cuttings, tubers

life cycles 

amphibians, insects, insects, birds, bulbs, reproduction, naturalist 

hatching, rearing, grow, reproduce 

Spring 2

Earth and Space

  • I can describe the movement of the Earth and other planets relative to the Sun in the solar system
  • I can describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth
  • I can describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately  spherical bodies 
  • I can use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.

I can plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

I can identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

 

Idea

Compare the time of the day at different places on Earth through internet links and direct communiation 

Create simple models of the solar system 

Construct simple shadow clocks and sundials -calibrate to show midday – and the start / emd of school day 

Find out why some people think that structures such as Stonehenge might have been used as astronomical clocks.

Introduced to model of Sun and Earth that enables pupils to explain day and night 

Learn - Sun is a star in centre of solar system – it has 8 planets 

Moon is celestial body that orbits a planet 

Find out about how solar system has developed

Understand how the geocentric model of the solar system gave way to the heliocentric model by considering work of scientists – Ptolemy, Alhazen and Copernicus

 Solar system 

 Pluto – dwaft planet (2006) 

 Mercury

Venus 

Earth 

Mars 

Jupiter

Saturn

Uranus 

Neptune 

Summer  

Forces and Magnetism

  • I can explain that unsupported objects fall towards Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object 
  • I can identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces 
  • I can recognise that some mechanisms, including levers, pulleys and gears allow a smaller force to have a greater effect

 

I can plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary 

I can make measurements using a range of scientific equipment with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings where appropriate 

I can report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of results in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

 

Ideas 

Explore falling paper cones ir cupcake cases 

Design and make a variety of parachutes and carry out a fair test to determine which design is most effective 

Explore resistance in water by making a testing boats of different shapes 

Design and make artefacts that use simple lever,pulleys, gears and or springs and explore their effects 

Explore falling objects and raise questions about effects of air resistance 

 Explore the effects of air resistance by observing how objects fall e.g. parachutes and sycamore seeds 

Experience forces that make things move, get faster or slow down 

Explore effects of friction on movement – and find out how it slows or stops moving objects – e.g. breaks on a bike 

Look at Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton

 

 

History Intent

History is important as all around us; it helps to ignite curiosity about the past in Britain and the wider world. Through finding out about how and why the world, our country, culture and local community have developed over time, pupils understand how the past influences the present. 

History enables pupils to develop a context for their growing sense of identity and a chronological framework for their knowledge of significant events and people.  It allows an understanding of their place in the world and in the long story of human development

At The Forwards Centre our intent is to deliver a history curriculum that:

  • stimulates, motivates and engages pupils who may have missed significant parts of their education and who may have had a negative experience of learning, in order for them to develop their knowledge, skills and understanding of the world around them;
  • enables all pupils to experience academic success - ensuring that no child is disadvantaged due to their academic level, SEND need or what point on their educational journey they are at or what time in the year they arrive, by having a “climbing frame” to achieve clear ambitious end points.

At The Forwards Centre we aim to help pupils gain a secure knowledge and understanding of their immediate history, that being their family and location; Britain’s past and that of the wider world. The curriculum has been designed to:

  • allow pupils to make links between current and previous learning;
  • make comparisons between different historical periods, places and societies;
  • develop chronological knowledge and understanding from the Stone Age to present day.

At The Forwards Centre we want pupils to be curious to know more about the past and to have the skills required to do this by working and thinking as historians and developing historical skills.  We recognise that it is not enough for pupils to just learn a series of facts about the past. We aim to enable pupils to:

  • research and interpret evidence, experiencing and using a range of different sources,
  • think critically – weighing up what they have found, asking questions about this, and drawing their own conclusions,
  • develop the ability think empathetically – putting themselves in someone else’s shoes
  • work independently or collaboratively, to ask, as well as answer, historical questions and
  • make reasoned decisions and have the necessary skills to construct historical arguments from their point of view, based on evidence and different sources.

Forwards Centre History: LONG-TERM OVERVIEW

 

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

KS1

 Cycle A

 

History 

Why do we celebrate different events

 

Bonfire night

Christmas 

Remembrance day

 

History

Changes within living memory 

 

What was life like for Grandma and Grandad? 

History

Events beyond living memory  

 

Great Fire of London  

 

KS1 

Cycle B

History 

Lives of Significant people 

 

Florence Nightingale or Mary Seacole 

 

 

 

 

 History 

Lives of Significant people 

 

Christopher Columbus v Neil Armstrong

 

LKS2

 Cycle A

History

Prehistoric Britain (Pre Roman)

Stone Age, Iron Age 

 

History

(Aspects of British History)

The changing power of Monarchs over time

 

LKS2 

Cycle B

 

History

(Early Civilisation)

Ancient Egypt – what did the Egypitans do for us? 

 

UKS2 

Cycle A

History

(Invaders / Early Settlement)

The Romans, Anglo Saxons and The Vikings 

 

History

(Local history study)

Brilliant Bolton

UKS2 

Cycle B

 

History

(Ancient History)

Ancient Greece 

 

 

KS1 Cycle A -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Term  

Topic

What children will be learning 

Possible ideas 

Key Vocab 

Autumn

Why do we celebrate different events

 

Bonfire night

Christmas 

Remembrance day

  • I know what a number of older objects were used for
  • I know about an event or events that happened long ago, even before my grandparents were born
  • I know that my life today is different to those of children a long time ago
  • I can differentiate between things that were here 100 years ago and things that were not (including buildings, tools, toys, etc.)
  • I know the name of a famous person from the past and explain why they were famous (Guy Fawkes, Mary Joseph Jesus and Gabriel, Walter Tull)

Opportunities during this topic to practise following historical skills 

  • I can use a timeline to order events
  • I can recognise the difference between past and present in my own life and others lives 
  • I can sk questions about events and individuals from the past 
  • I can explore objects from the past and ask questions such as “what they were used for?” (Gunpowder plot)
  • I can talk about the differences between my own life and the life of my grandparents / great grandparents (Rememberence Day)
  • I can describe memories of key events in my life (Christmas)

 

Use timeline to order all key celebrations (highlightning when they were born as a marker)

Talk about some of the key events and people involved in the Gunpowder Plot. 

Explain why the Gunpowder Plot happened. 

Sequence the main events of the Gunpowder Plot (on a time line to indroduce or recp on idea of chronology).

Look at items used when Guy Fawkes was alive

Talk about some of the key events and countries involved in the First World War. 

Recall key facts about the life of Walter Tull and why he is significant in history. 

Describe some experiences of men, women and animals involved in the First World War. Explain what happens on Remembrance Day and why it is marked.

Talk about key events of Christmas Story – spend time discussing Christmas at home and what it is like 

Events, Bonfire night, Christmas, Remembrance day, past, present, timeline, Gunpowder plot, 

Spring

Changes within living memory 

 

What was life like for Grandma and Grandad ? 

 

 

 

  • I know that the toys my grandparents played with were different to my own
  • I know that artefacts can be ordered by age 
  • I know what a number of older objects were used for
  • I know that my life today is different to those of children a long time ago
  • I can differentiate between things that were here 100 years ago and things that were not 

Opportunities during this topic to practise following historical skills 

  • I can talk about the differences between my own life and the life of my grandparents 
  • I can match objects to people of different ages 
  • I can sort objects into groups (e.g. then and now)
  • I can use a timeline to order events or objects 
  • I can recognise why people did things the way they did
  • I can understand the difference between fact and fiction (link to how grandparents memories and view points might not be accuate as might have forgotten or see things from their perspective)
  • I can use different sources to find out about the past – pictures, books, photos, accounts 
  • I can explore events, look at pictures and ask simple questions such as “which things were old and which were new?”  “what were the people doing?” 
  • I can explore objects from the past and ask questions such as “what were they used for”? 
  • I can ask questions about events and individuals from the past 
  • I can sequence events in my own life 
  • I can organise a number of artefacts by age

 

Talk about differences between own lives and that of grandparents (e.g. school, games)

Look at different asks

Sequence events in their own lives / compare this to events in grandparents lives 

Describe features of different toys – link to science  

Recognise old and new toys. 

Use words relating to the passing of time – increase vocab

 

Toys, wood, plastic, grandparents, Victorians, years, old, new, past, present, timeline, Granma, Grandad, children, age, object, artefact, 

Summer

History 

Events beyond living memory 

 

Great Fire of London  

 

  • I can recall facts about the Great Fire of London and understand where this event took place on a timeline 
  • I know about an event or events that happened long ago, even before my grandparents were born            
  • I know what a number of older objects were used for
  • I know that my life today is different to those of children a long time ago
  • I know the name of a famous person from the past and explain why they are famous

Opportunities during this topic to practise following historical skills 

  •  I can compare 2 versions of a past event 
  • I can consider the reliabililty of different sources 

Talk about some of the key events of the Great Fire of London.

Say why the Great Fire of London spread and eventually stopped.

Explain that we know about the Great Fire because of Samuel Pepys' diary

Fire, London, Samuel Pepys, past, 

Present, old, new, object, artefact,

Grandparents, 

 

KS1 Cycle B -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

What children will be learning 

Possible ideas

Key Vocab

Autumn

History 

Lives of Significant people 

 

Florence Nightingale 

 

  • I know about a famous person from outside the UK and explain why they are famous
  • I know the name of a famous person from the past and explain why they are famous
  • I know that my life today is different to those of children a long time ago
  • I know about an event or events that happened long ago, even before my grandparents were born
  • I know that artefacts can be ordered by age 
  • I know what a number of older objects were used for

Opportunities during this topic to practise following historical skills 

  • I can match objects to people of different ages
  • I can sort objects into groups e.g. then and now
  • I can use a timeline to order events or objects
  • I can recall some facts about significant figures in History (Neil Armstrong, Christopher Columbus, Mary Seacole, Florence Nightingale, Edith Cavell 
  • I can recognise why people did things the way they did 
  • I can explain how they have influenced our lives today

Know how Florence Nightingale, Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell have helped and influenced nursing and hospitals today. 

Talk about the differences and similarities in the lives of Florence Nightingale, Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell. 

Have an understanding of the chronology of the historical periods in which Florence Nightingale, Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell lived. 

Recall some key facts about the experiences of Florence Nightingale, Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell

 

Hospitals, nurse, doctor, dirty, 

Clean, old, new, past, present, 

Change, Florence Nightingale 

Famous, objects, timeline, lady of 

the lamp. 

 

 

  •  

 

 

Summer

History 

Lives of Significant people 

 

Christopher Columbus v Neil Armstrong

  • I know the name of a famous person from the past and explain why they are famous
  • I know about a famous person from outside the UK and explain why they are famous

 

Opportunities during this topic to practise following historical skills 

  • I can recall some facts about a significant figures in history
  • I can use different sources to find out about the past - pictures, books, photos etc. 
  • I can compare 2 versions of a past event 
  • I can explore events, look at pictures and ask simple questions such as “which things were old and which were new?”  “what were the people doing?” 
  • I can explore objects from the past and ask questions such as “what were they used for”?  

 

Research Christopher Columbus / Neil Armstrong to find out who both men are and why they are famous; 

Make comparisons about the 2 explorers 

Explain why Christopher Columbus / Neil Armstrong are significant.

 

Famous, Christopher Columbus ,

Neil Armstrong, space, ship, moon, sea,

Past, present, comparison, event,

Artefact, voyage, moon landing, space 

Travel, at sea. 

 

LKS2 Cycle A -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

What children will be learning 

Possible ideas

Key Vocab 

Autumn

History

Prehistoric Britain 

Stone Age

Bronze Age 

Iron Age 

  •  
  • I know how Britain has changed between the beginning of the stone age and the iron age 
  • I know the main differences between the stone, bronze and iron ages
  • I know what is meant by ‘hunter-gatherers’

 

Opportunities during this topic to practise following historical skills 

 

  • I can place the time studied on a time line 
  • I can sequence several events or artefacts from the period 
  • I can place events from the period studied on time line 
  • I can use dates and terms relating to the study unit and passing of time
  • I can learn about the everyday lives of people the Iron Age and Stone Age
  • I can use evidence to learn about life at the times taught 
  • I can identify key information about the times studied 
  • I can offer some simple explanations for events
  • I can observe small details in artefacts and pictures 
  • I can use books and the internet for research
  • I can ask a variety of questions
  • I can use the terms BC

 

 Find out about where the Stone Age gets its name. 

Look at which tools were crucial to the survival of early man.

Find out about how Skara Brae was discovered. 

Find out about the names of some items found at Skara Brae. 

Find out about why children worked in copper mines. 

  • Find out about two reasons why Iron Age people wanted to protect their homes. 

 

stone age, iron age, bronze age, hunter gatherer, early man, tool, crucial, Skara Brae

Spring

 

 

 

 

Summer

History

The changing power of Monarchs over time 

 

And the Vicotrians 

 

 

  • I know about a theme in British history which extends beyond 1066 and explain why this was important in relation to British history
  • I know how to place historical events and people from the past societies and periods in a chronological framework
  • I know how Britain has had a major influence on the world

 

Opportunities during this topic to practise following historical skills 

  • I can place the time studied on a time line 
  • I can sequence several events from the period 
  • I can place events from the period studied on time line 
  • I can use dates and terms relating to the study unit and passing of time 
  • I can use the terms AD
  • I can identify different ways in which the past is represented 
  • I can give simple reasons why the past is shown differently in different sources for different ways in which the past is represented 
  • I can distinguish between different sources – compare different versions of the same story 
  • I can begin to understand that people in the past gave interpretations that helps them persuade others
  • I can use a range of sources to find out about a period 
  • I can select and record information relevant to the study
  • I can use books and the internet for research
  • I can use a range of evidence to build up a picture of the past 
  • I can choose relevant material to understand one aspect of life 
  • I can ask a variety of questions

Look at life in Britain during the times of different reigns e.g in Norman England 

Look at a map of the British Empire to understand why the UK was such a powerful nation in the Victorian era.

Use timeline to plot chronolgy and have a chronological understanding of which monarch reigned in relation to another. 

Look at Magna Carta and discuss why it was an important document 

 

Look at how power changed during the different reigns 

 

Possible ideas of who to look at 

 

William the Conqueror, 

King John, 

Henry VIII,

Queen Anne, 

Queen Victoria

Modern Royal family 

Reign

Empire

Powerful 

Victorian era

Nation 

Monarch

Magna carta 

Society 

AD 

Source 

William the Conqueror

King John 

Henry VIII

Queen Anne 

Queen Victoria

Royal Family 

 

 

 

 

LKS2 Cycle B -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

What children will be learning 

Possible ideas

Key Vocab

Autumn

 

 

 

 

Spring

History

Ancient Egypt

 

what did the Egypitans do for us?

  • I know about, and can name, one of the advanced societies that were in the world around 3000 years ago
  • I know about the key features of Ancient Egypt;

Opportunities during this topic to practise following historical skills 

  • I can learn about the everyday lives of people in Ancient Egypt 
  • I can compare my everyday life to theirs 
  • I can identify reasons for their actions and the results of these. 
  • I can place the time studied on a time line 
  • I can sequence several events or artefacts from the period 
  • I can place events from the period studied on time line 
  • I can use dates and terms relating to the study unit and passing of time 
  • I can use the terms BC and AD 
  • I can use evidence to learn about life at the times taught 
  • I can identify key information about the times studied 
  • I can offer some simple explanations for events 
  • I can identify different ways in which the past is represented 
  • I can give simple reasons why the past is shown differently in different sources for different ways in which the past is represented 
  • I can distinguish between different sources – compare different versions of the same story 
  • I can look at two sources of evidence and identify differences 
  • I can give simple reasons why it may be different 
  • I can observe small details in artefacts and pictures 
  • I can use a range of sources to find out about a period 
  • I can select and record information relevant to the study
  • I can use books and the internet for research
  • I can use  a range of evidence to build up a picture of the past 
  • I can choose relevant material to understand one aspect of life 
  • I can ask a variety of questions

Aim to understand what the Egyptians did for us

 

Understand what was important to people during ancient Egyptian times. 

 

Compare the powers of different Egyptian gods. 

 

Find Egypt on a map. 

 

Raise questions when confronted with an artefact in order to understand more about this ancient civilisation and select information that is useful in understanding the use of hieroglyphs as a form of communication and recording

Advanced society 

Ancient Egypt 

Civilization 

Sequence 

Artefact 

BC / AD 

Explanation 

Sources 

Representation 

Compare 

hieroglyphs

Detail 

Egyptian Gods – Ra,  Anubis,  Osiris, Nut and Geb, Sekhmet. Horus, Thoth, Isis, Set 

 

 

 

Summer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UKS2 Cycle A -  MEDIUM-TERM OVERVIEW

Half term 

Topic

What children will be learning 

Possible ideas